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Search Results 0 to 32 of about 33 (some duplicates have been removed)
for the president's second term with david ignatius of the "washington post" and journalist and author james mann. >> woodruff: then, we turn back to the tragedy in newtown, connecticut, as more victims are laid to rest one week after the shootings. >> brown: speaking out for the first time since the massacre, the nra's wayne lapierre rejects calls for new limits on guns. >> i asked congress today to act immediately to appropriate whatever is necessary to put armed police officers in every single school in this nation. >> woodruff: and ray suarez talks to mark glaze, director of the pro-gun control advocacy group mayors against illegal guns. >> brown: plus, we hear from high school students from across the country, and gwen ifill talks with secretary of education arne duncan. >> schools have been forever the safe haven, often safest places in the community. and we need to continue to do everything in our power to make sure that they are. >> woodruff: kwame holman updates washington's spending and tax stalemate after house republicans decide not to follow the leader. >> brown: and mark shields and
of it is prevalent in the papers. wednesday with congress and the president heading back to washington. here is a headline on "usa today." in the wall street journal -- if the in "the washington post." we welcome your phone calls. we will get to them in a moment. we did find another piece at politico. there you have it in the papers this morning about people being optimistic or pessimistic about things. i want to dig a little bit deeper into "the wall street journal" piece. i we will probably see some what of a flurry of activity tomorrow. if first call. what is your name and where are you calling from? i think that caller is gone. let's try the next call. caller: i am optimistic because this is a great country. we are one nation under god that. i think people ought to turn to their faith during these times because we have always needed to through hard times. host: how will this play in washington but the fiscal glove? caller: i think the republicans are going to have to give it more than the democrats. president obama is basically going to do with the people voted him in for. i think he wil
: kwame holman updates washington's spending and tax stalemate after house republicans decide not to follow the leader. >> brown: and mark shields and michael gerson analyze the week's news. >> woodruff: that's all ahead on tonight's newshour. >> major funding for the pbs newshour has been provided by: >> bnsf railway. >> support also comes from carnegie corporation of new york, a foundation created to do what andrew carnegie called "real and permanent good." celebrating 100 years of philanthropy at carnegie.org. >> and with the ongoing support of these institutions and foundations. and friends of the newshour. and... >> this program was made possible by the corporation for public broadcasting. and by contributions to your pbs station from viewers like you. thank you. >> brown: the remaking of the obama administration's foreign policy team began today as the president nominated massachusetts senator john kerry to replace hilary clinton as secretary of state. the former presidential candidate who lost to george w. bush in 2004 got the nod after u.n. ambassador susan rice withdr
is that? tom foreman is in washington to speculate. good morning. >> reporter: hi, carroll. we don't know what that means. there's been speculation it will have something to do with mental health issues because certainly at a lot of local levels people talked about that on the republican side. people on the conservative side saying that has to be addressed as much, perhaps more than the gun issue itself. so we're expecting that may be the direction to go but the truth is we don't really know. what we do know is that the nra was quiet immediately after this. they often are after such incidents and they usually say as they did this time out of respect for the community and the family involved but now that a little bit of time has passed what we would certainly expect here is that there would be a clear message to the white house and to others which is be careful about overreacting at this point because the nra will push back and certainly they have proven that politically they have the power to do it not only nationally but certainly at the state level. carol? >> tom foreman reporting live
the can down the road doesn't make anybody younger or wiser in washington, but often keeps them elected. thanks for watching "state of the union" i'm candy crowley in washington. if you missed any part of today's show, find us on itunes. just search "state of the union." stay with cnn for continuing coverage of the fiscal cliff negotiations. fareed zakaria "gps" is next. >>> the great french writer albert camel said life is a sum of all your choices. we're all defined by the choices we make every day, we make hundreds of them. paper or plastic, chicken or fish, most are mundane and require little thought, but others are agonizing, often life altering and then there are the decisions made by leaders. some of which have changed the course of history for better and some for worse. july 1776, the founding fathers decision to declare independence. january 1863, abraham lincoln's decision to emancipate all persons held as slaves. june 1941, adolf hitler's decision to invade the soviet union. august 1945, president truman's decision to use an atomic bomb against japan. tonight, we'll examine t
and specified commands. they have indeed greatly increased staffs and they even have elements in washington that begin to act like lobbies. when a new problem arises, a joint task force is put together. and that makes sense. and the elements may come from more than one of the unified and specified commands. so i think another look is needed at not at the question of jointness, but at how it's carried out. and how the overhead is distributed. >> you worked in the pentagon during the vietnam war and there are those and you even mentioned certain parallels between the vietnam conflict and what we're seeing in afghanistan. right now there's a big debate going on in washington whether or not troop levels should remain high to ensure that we can train the afghans fast enough to hand over control before we leave at the end of 2014. why is that a bad idea from your standpoint? >> the real question is what kind of country is going to -- will it be possible to leave behind? and the case of vietnam, my own conclusion back in period of 1967, '68, became that the government there was unsustainable becau
letter to secretary clinton and left washington. she resumed her princeton professorship and life in new jersey with her husband and two teenage sons. in the wake of her departure, slaughter wrote a cover story for "the atlantic magazine" why women still can't have it all. within days, the piece became the most read in t"the atlantic's" history. tonight, she takes us behind that personal decision that became a raging public debate. explain the intensity of that kind of job, because it's really much more than what many people think. thisst is a more intense job th senior jobs in the private sector. >> it's certainly comparable. it's an assistant secretary job, which means you're on pretty much all the time. you're the head of the secretary of state's private think tank. that means you cover the entire world, just as she does. and you're on for everything she needs you to do. and every sort of -- the longer-term planning and you work pretty much round the clock. >> so you're working probably six days a week? >> absolutely. now, i commuted back every weekend because i had to be with my kids
to the relationships here in washington, it's a good thing that it's these two men that are working together and you're right, it does rest on their shoulders right now. >> dana bash, covering the stories for us on capitol hill. i have with me michael crowley, and a.b. stoddard and jessica yellen. >> it's great if the two can come to an agreement and the white house loves it, but it's always been the house that's been the sticking point. what do you think the scenario is there, a.b.? >> that's going to be tough for the house speaker. he said on friday in meeting with all the leaders and the president that he wanted to bring something up. might be amended and sent back to the senate. he doesn't know what's in there. how much money the democrats are going to push for to cover the medicare doc fix. the uninsurance -- excuse me, unemployment insurance that is going to lapse at the end of the year and put 2 million people out of reach of a check. and there's other issues. the alternative minimum tax. a lot of money that they're scrambling to find as they also deal with the tax issues. so it's really goin
diplomacy in the years ahead. >> reporter: wolf, with his 30 years in washington and kerry's comfort with the ways of the senate, john kerry might not be a natural partner for the president but the two men have come to respect one another, especially when the president has dispatched him to work on issues in pakistan and afghanistan and sudan. but especially as they joufted with each other during debate prep for many hours in the nevada desert and at camp david, wolf. >> stand by after you hear from the president, right at the top of the hour, 5:00 p.m. eastern, he'll be in the white house briefing room to make a statement on the fiscal cliff. you'll be there as well. thank you, jessica. >>> john kerry's nomination taps what has been a tumultuous time for the white house to find a secretary of state. a look now at the senior senator from massachusetts. >> reporter: many regarded as the worst-kept secret in washington, even in recent senate hearings, john kerry already sounded like he was looking ahead to his future job and the anticipated budget problems with congress. >> that must c
's what i thought i want to say. in washington so often as you know, sam, from covering the white house, you have the pseudo-events where people come out and say now is the time where i'm going to sound reasonable. >> yes. >> and that's the goal of the day. even though they don't give up. >> that was what was news about this coverage. >> did he soubd reasonable to you? >> not at all. he trolled the press corps. he didn't even take questions. he wanted cameras on him and say exactly the same thing that the nra says after gun violence. this is the media's fault. this is hollywood's fault. >> let me bring back michael. let's put aside your substantive disagreement with the nra. >> sure. >> were you surprised that he sounded cold rather than compassionate about this terrible mass murder? >> sure. you are asking me to be strategic for him, and i will. look, you step up to the podium, and you say this is an american tragedy. what happened, no party to this can in any fashion acknowledge that it was good. it was bad. now, i understand that you have a problem with my industry, and i get that. i
with the washington newspaper. he says without an immediate deal, the discussion will significantly change in the new year. >> i think what we will see from the republicans is much greater flexibility as we get into the new year, if it comes to that. and, instead of voting for a tax increase, they are voting for a tax cut. the same policy, when you are voting for it on january 4, would be a tax cut. today, it would be a tax increase. it is a weird way of thinking about it, but we are a strange land, in terms of u.s. policy right now. heather is a sense the entire dynamic would change if we get a few days into the new year without a deal. the white house feel they have gone close to as far as they can go in terms of an offer. the have adjusted their proposal on tax increases so they would only go up on those making $400,000 a year, not $250,000 a year. they want real concessions out of the republicans before the agreed to everything. they do not want to negotiate against themselves and throw in the towel when they do not need to. >> what does it mean for the world economy if the u.s. does fall off thi
diplomatic security spending by $1.3 billion. you know, in washington where too often we see recommendations of blue ribbon panels ignored, delayed, or deferred as they were for a long time even on the 9/11 commission, i think the secretary's swift action underscores how determined she is to apply the lessons of benghazi. clearly, mistakes were made, and we see -- we learned of those yesterday and in very stark terms about the mistakes leading up to the attack. the report makes that very clerks and one of the most candid and important observations was the failure by certain leaders to see the forest through the trees. there were clear warning signs that security situation in libya deteriorated, and going forward, it is important, and i think it's important for all of us to think in terms of going forward, that we need to do better jobs of ensuring a free and open dialogue among ambassadors, their security personnel, and officials in washington where decisions on security staffing levels and funding are made. now, as we draw the lessons, i want to be crystal clear about something else. congre
vacation short and heading back to washington before we fall off of the fiscal cliff . can a deal be reached. >> a deadly winter storm unleashing snow and tornados . now thousands ever cleaning up and holiday travelers are stuck. i am tracking where the storm ised hading next. >> thank you, rick. take the gift card and hit the stores this morning. wait until "fox and friends" is over and then leave. "fox and friends" begins right now. "fox and friends". >> gretchen: good morning, i am gretchen carlson we are joined by clayton morris . rick as well . these are great guys, but clayton, because he is a tech guru of folks news and here to help all of us today. >> tech support this morning f. you have tech-related questions. send them and i will attempt to answer them all. i answered all of them. my wife said what are you doing on twitter? i said i am helping me. >> gretchen: we have big storms brewing and rick, you are aptly sitting to the right of me and you will help people get out of town. >> 30 tornados and a big one in mobile, alabama and more tornados and a blizzard. i will try
-dollar deficits for as far as the eye can see. listen, washington has got a spending problem not a revenue problem. if the president doesn't agree with our proposal i believe that he's got an obligation to families and small businesses to offer a plan of his own, a plan that can pass both chambers of the congress. we are ready and eager to talk to the president about such a plan. >> you did speak with the president earlier this week, can you characterize that call? did he have any kind of counter offer? also, we understand that he is making clear that it's got to be increase in rates for the wealthy or no deal. are you willing to give a little bit maybe not all the way to 39.6? >> the phone call was pleasant, just more of the same. the conversations that the staff had yesterday, just more of the same. it's time for the president, if he's serious, to come back to us with a counter offer. >> the jobs report today indicated unemployment is down roughly a full point from this time last year. a lot of folks in the business community say if no deal is going to happen it could obviously hurt american job
, what many regarded as the worst-kept secret in washington, even in recent senate hearings john kerry sound like he was looking ahead to the future job and the anticipated battled over the state department budget with with congress. >> that must change and in the next session of the congress i hope it will. >> reporter: he wasn't the president's first choice. u.n. ambassador susan rice took herself out of the running after republican backlash. >> it was unjustified to give the scenario as presented by ambassador rice. >> reporter: senator kerry knows himself about being torpedoed by attacks. accused in his 2004 presidential run of lying about his military record in vietnam. >> john kerry has not been honest about what happened in vietnam. >> reporter: and criticized for his 1971 testimony opposing vietnam war. >> how do you ask a man to be the last man to die in vietnam? >>> kerry was painted a flip-flopper and out of touch, and unable to grasp struggles of regular americans and kerry did put president obama, then an unknown politician on the national stage at the democratic conventio
amendment rights of the constitution. host: there is this headline in "the washington post" this morning. host: does that need to be looked at as well? guest: we had much more of a country that still restricted alcohol after prohibition four decades ago. that is one reason atf has fewer agents. canada tried to register the firearms and tried for over 10 years and finally dropped it. that didn't work out. i am not saying we shouldn't keep better records. fbi and other agencies should look at the background of everyone. i am not an expert in all these areas. having this debate where everybody blames the gun and everybody says it is the people involved on the other side, that is too simplistic. we have to put everything on the table. we can debate everything. we should debate our mental health situation. connecticut does not allow forced medication for people that are mentally ill. and our gun-free zone policy, which obviously has not worked. host: "the washington post" also notes -- host: joe from maryland. caller: my name is joe and i'm watching this on the news and everything. i make vie
the authority to reprogram funds to increase diplomatic security spending by $1.3 billion. in a washington where too often we see the recommendations of panels ignored or deferred, as they were for a long time on even the 9/11 commission, i think the secretarys swift action underscores how determined she is to apply the lessons of benghazi. clearly, mistakes were made. we learned of those yesterday in stark terms about the mistakes leading up to the attacks. the report makes that very clear. one of the most candid and important observations was the failure by certain leaders to see the forest through the trees. there were clear warning signs that the security situation in libya had deteriorated. going forward, it is important -- and i think it is important for all of us to think in these terms -- we need to do a better job of ensuring a free and open dialogue among ambassadors, the embassy security personnel, and officials in washington for decisions on funding and staffing levels and security. as we draw lessons, i want to be crystal clear about something else. congress also bears some responsi
, and doing some speaking but staying as far from washington, d.c. as i can. >> rose: when you look at writing a book, i mean, how hard is that for you to take the time anand think of all of the events and make sure that you get it right as you recollect it? >> first i have given myself a little out at the beginning by saying this is a purely personal reminiscence of what i experienced and what i saw, i am not trying to write the defensive history and others will have a different perspective on things, but it was -- we were at war every day of the four and a half years i was in office, and as i write in the book it wasn't just the wars in iraq and afghanistan, it was daily wars with the congress, with other agencies, with the white house, and also i would say with my own building, with the pentagon. >> rose: fighting over what within the pentagon? >> trying to make the first priority of the pentagon to be successful in the wars we were already in, the pentagon bureaucracy is structured to plan for war, not to wage war, and so getting badly needed equipment to the troops fast in months rather t
tonight i yield whatever time she might want to take to our colleague from the great state of washington -- hawaii. ms. hanabusa: thank you very much to the gentleman from california. i'm here to honor a state which is unique and as special as the person i honor. the person i rise to honor is daniel k. inouye. a person who cannot be described by a single adjective. a person whose accomplishments would cause you to pause and say, is this one person? is this one man? a person was awarded the greatest honor anyone who serves in the military can achieve, the congressional medal of honor. but it was an honor about 55 years late. from a country that questioned his loyalty due to the fact that he was an american of japanese ancestry. a person who could not get a hair cut after being severely wounded and giving -- and given his arm in battle because he looked like the enemy. a person who insisted that instead of being bitter he would dedicate his life to doing all he can to right social inequities and description of all kinds -- discrimination of all kinds. to do this he became part of the democ
, washington correspondent of "the nation" with the latest on today's fiscal cliff development, and the people who will get crushed if nothing gets done. share your thoughts with us on facebook and on twitter using the #edshow. we're coming right back. >>> welcome back to "the ed show." on a day when a community laid more victims to rest, on a day when a nation stopped just briefly to honor the dead, the national rifle association came out swinging, defiant, paranoid, and utterly tone-deaf. >> this is the beginning of a serious conversation. we won't be taking questions. >> but nra president david keene was just the warm-up act for the gun lobby's number one defender, wayne lapierre. wayne lapierre offered up a televised sales pitch to america, making the case to expand the gun market by demanding more guns in schools. >> with all the foreign aid the united states does, with all the money in the federal budget, can't we afford to put a police officer in every single school? i call on congress today to act immediately to appropriate whatever is necessary to put armed police officers in every si
. while those back to washington d.c. the testify in court? is just not doable. i think that he is quite right that within the unique concepts -- context of guantanamo bay where we half for a handful of detainees left and have engaged essentially in a war of choice, although with respect to the war on terror, more broadly and obviously we have to fight back against terrorism in some capacity. the underlying nature of the detention authority is not that these people being held for crimes. there being held prevented league as a matter of preventive detention to ensure they don't get back on the field and have an opportunity to kill our soldiers. the question becomes, when you take their reasonableness of the d.c. circuit's handling of the responsibilities of the supreme court with respect to this relatively small population, there's no question, the united states, given all of our wealth of resources can handle habeas cases dealing with a few hundred detainees data guantanamo bay. were up putting more people there because we don't want to have to do with the burdens of doing it but we can
. for what purpose does the gentleman from washington seek recognition? >> to address the house for one minute and revise and extend. the speaker pro tempore: without objection, so ordered. >> i rise to recognize the outstanding service of jay johnson of the department of defense in navigating a wide range of important legal issues, he's been an invaluable partner to the house aarped services committee. over the last four years he advised the committee on numerous national security challenges including cyberwarfare, counterterrorism operation the legal boundaries in the conflict against al qaeda, and detainee operations worldwide. he was integral tour efforts to reform military commissions for those -- with those accused of planning and executing the 9/11 attacks will be tried. he's created briefings on don't ask, don't tell, efforts to combat sexual assault in the military, changes to the combat exclusion policy, the member of the joint chiefs staff and the withdrawal of troops from iraq. there's been no shortage of difficult and controversial issues. he's always approached them intell
. until then, part of our conversation on this morning's "washington journal" about the impact of medicare about the fiscal cliff negotiations. host: and here on "washington journal," we are going to continue our look that we've done over the last couple of weeks at the so-called fiscal cliff and its impact on taxes and spending and some other issues. and today we're focusing on the issue of medicare, and our guest is mary agnus carey, senior health care correspondent for the kaiser health care news. mary agnus, just as a reminder for our viewers, how is medicare funded? guest: well, medicare has part a is funded by payroll taxes, gets taken out of their checks. part b and d. part b is your outpatient service and part d is prescription drugs and it's funded by yn revenue. host: is it self-sustaining? does it pay for itself? guest: in the sense general revenues pays for it, its needs are met and then the medicare trustees says the program is funded through 2024 in part because of the reductions in the health care law to providers and here we're talking about the part a trust fund. as we kno
never get the "washington post" to print this point, but robert byrd when he was majority leader exercise the nuclear option four times. it goes back to the beginning of the senate whereby you set binding precedent in the senate by simple majority rules. furthermore, it was being used admittedly extraordinary, one that i think out to be used in very rare occasion, only for extenuating circumstances was done not to up in the tradition but to restore it. prior to 2003 derrick never been a judge, avril edition nominee denied confirmation deeply filibuster. never, never, never never. beginning with -- i think ultimately five judges who have the majority support, push judges who were all denied confirmation deeply filibuster though they had majority support. prior to that it'd never happen. so we are trying to restore the what it always been. you can argue that ought to be a majority. that had not been the standard pride 2003. on your question of time, you're right. biggest vulnerability is time. everything takes so long. i remember when it came to the house and i came over to the sen
. the clerk: washington, d.c, december 4, 2012. to the senate: under the provisions of rule 1, paragraph 3, of the standing rules of the senate, i hereby appoint the honorable christopher a. coons, a senator from the state of delaware, to perform the duties of the chai. signed: daniel k. inouye, president pro tempore. mr. reid: mr. president? the presiding officer: the majority leader. mr. reid: following leader remarks, the senate will proceed to executive session to consider the disabilities trite. the time until noon will be equally divided and controlled between the two leaders or their designees. at noon there will be a roll call vote on the resolution of advise and consent to the convention on rights of persons with disabilities. we don't do treaties often and there are requests from both --m senators on both sides of the aisle. i think the they're right, becae this is a treaty, the votes will take place from our desks today. everybody should be on notice. following the vote, mr. president, the senate will recess to allow for our weekly caucus meetings. additional votes in resolution
Search Results 0 to 32 of about 33 (some duplicates have been removed)